The following are questions and answers from an interview with Nazim Nice, NCARB LEED AP, who is the Principal Architect at Motionspace Architecture + Design PLLC

Q:You’re always in the natural position of giving the design idea just based on your profession, but sometimes the client gives you there “dream idea” to you for their space.  What is an idea that has stood out in your experience and how did you handle it?

Earning my client’s trust is not the result of any one single thing, but the aggregate of all of our interactions with each other. As an Architect, my clients expect expert advice, good design, and a professional level of service. From our first meeting, I demonstrate my expertise through our discussions about a potential project. This also includes listening to my clients needs and making suggestion when appropriate. In the interviewing process, many architects withhold their ideas because they don’t want to give them away without compensation.  I use the first meeting to listen to the project requirements, discuss ideas, and show example images from past projects of similar solutions. After we begin the job, I view all my interactions with my clients as an opportunity to gain their trust by always giving my honest opinion, and backing it up with why one might choose a particular design direction over another. Ultimately it is the client’s choice since it is their project, but most people want to know they are making the right decision.

Q:Trust is a huge part of any construction project between the professional team assembled and the client.  How do you gain that trust through the design process and still guide them in new directions that they may not understand at first?

I had a client purchase a mid-century modern home and then tell me they would love to make it into a Mediterranean style home with stucco arches, and tile roof. However, they did not have the budget to transform the interior and exterior of the home into a completely different style. After quite a bit of educating the client and discussing how we might incorporate the feeling of a Mediterranean home while still working with the clean lines, large expanses of glass, and clear structural expression of the mid-century style. By introducing materials, colors, and a few design elements from Mediterranean architecture, but reinterpreted in a modern way, we were able to achieve the client’s goals but still be true to the home’s original style.

Clients often have ambitious wish lists for their projects and at first glance it may seem impossible to incorporate everything into a project. But more often than not, I am able to craft a solution that meets the clients requirements and also adds something more. My role is to listen to a clients needs, but also identify all the problems to be solved. Many times those problems are not apparent, or even identified by the client because most people are not trained to identify architectural issues. In a recent proj